Effective Record Keeping in Learning and Teaching

By Zafar Iqbal

Maintaining efficient and accurate records is a very significant element of a teacher’s role, despite the fact that often it is thought to be the monotonous part of teaching cycle. Record keeping is both a public and personal thing. It is public because tutors need to show their records when they are asked for. Furthermore, it is personal because teachers need to have a system that is easy for them to use (NCETM, 2011).

Importance of Record-Keeping

  • Clear records help the learners to see definite progress toward reading goals and to motivate the student to continue learning development.
  • Records of activities and student responses show effectiveness over time because all information helps in planning future lessons.
  • Record keeping also helps to satisfy the employers as every organization needs to show that its members are doing their jobs effectively. Therefore, all records from pre- and post-testing, student activities and logs of instructional time become documentation for teacher’s proficiency at their job. (Sandy, 2011)
  • Records help the parent organization justify the money being spent on training and supplies in relation to student progress, making funding more available from donors and grant-making organizations.

 Ways of recording students information 

Evidence can be:

  • recorded on tape,
  • in folios of pupil’s work;
  • brief notes in teachers’ jotters,
  • in teachers’ forward plans,
  • national tests,
  • checklists, worksheets,
  • video recording (permission from parents is must for under-age learners) record sheets,
  • self/peer assessment sheets,
  • Trainee/Pupils’ reports.

Types of Record:

  • Course application form;
  • Skills check results;
  • Individual Learning Plan;
  • Disability disclosure;
  • Learning Support referral;
  • Learner agreement;
  • Learning styles checks;
  • Copies of examination results
  • Pre-course written task;
  • Report from initial interview;
  • Learner’s profile etc.
  • Course application form;
  • Skills check results;
  • Individual Learning Plan;
  • Disability disclosure;
  • Learning Support referral;
  • Learner agreement;
  • Learning styles checks;
  • Copies of examination results
  • Pre-course written task;
  • Report from initial interview;
  • Learner profile;
  • Accident/incident form
  • Action plans;
  • Appeals;
  • Diagnostic test results;
  • Initial assessment;
  • Interview records;
  • Learning support record;
  • Register;
  • Retention, achievement and progression record;
  • Risk assessment;
  • Scheme of work;
  • Session plan;
  • Syllabus or qualifications handbook;
  • Tutorial reviews;
  • Verifiers and moderator reports;
  • Worksheets (Dallas, 2011).

 References:

 Dallas, J. (2011) Establishing Productive Record Keeping Practices [Online] available at:  http://teachersnetwork.org/NTOL/howto/align/c15768,.htm

Accessed on 05-06-2011

Sandy, F. (2011) Importance of Record-Keeping within Adult Literacy [Online] available at:  http://www.ehow.co.uk/about_6726030_importance-record_keeping-within-adult-literacy.html

Accessed on 05-06-2011

NCETM (2011) Record Keeping [online] available at: https://www.ncetm.org.uk/mathemapedia/RecordKeeping

Accessed on 05-06-2011

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